My Matignon


Seven members of my family have graduated from Matignon High School over three generations. You could say I knew where I would be going to high school once eighth grade rolled around. I did not even bother applying to any other school. The other schools were fine; they just were not Matignon. None of the other schools had the smartest woman I know –my Nonna– on their alumni list. None of the others schools were the place where my mother met her best friend, my lovely Auntie Laura. None of the other schools prepared my aunt for her years at Harvard University. None of the other schools allowed my sister to become a person who loved going to school, my cousin to win first place in the science fair, or my other cousin to fall in love with theater. Matignon was the obvious and only choice.

I remember sitting in Ms. Tartaglini’s biology lab in the fourth grade reading a high school chapter book while attending an open house for my sister. Ms. T saw me reading this thick book and immediately started talking to me. I loved looking through all the microscopes and seeing the weird preserved pig in a jar. The teacher made me excited to be in her biology class in the future. She even saved me extra cookies during the Magic of Matignon when my sister enrolled in the school. I am grateful for the opportunity to have been in her Honors and AP biology classes. 


Finally, during my first week at Matignon, I saw what all the fuss was about. Making friends was easy. I joined lots of clubs. My favorite part of Freshman Year was when I was elected Vice President of my class. Serving in this role for the past four years has been an honor. My favorite part of my experience at Matignon has been the lessons that happen in the classroom but stray from boring, everyday academics. I have found that the best classrooms, such as my junior/Ap English classes, are the ones that provide the safety to express my opinions, whether political or moral. Many schools do not provide this opportunity, and I hope Matignon continues to allow their students to experience the wonderful open discussions that I have cherished.

 

My Matignon


Seven members of my family have graduated from Matignon High School over three generations. You could say I knew where I would be going to high school once eighth grade rolled around. I did not even bother applying to any other school. The other schools were fine; they just were not Matignon. None of the other schools had the smartest woman I know –my Nonna– on their alumni list. None of the others schools were the place where my mother met her best friend, my lovely Auntie Laura. None of the other schools prepared my aunt for her years at Harvard University. None of the other schools allowed my sister to become a person who loved going to school, my cousin to win first place in the science fair, or my other cousin to fall in love with theater. Matignon was the obvious and only choice.

I remember sitting in Ms. Tartaglini’s biology lab in the fourth grade reading a high school chapter book while attending an open house for my sister. Ms. T saw me reading this thick book and immediately started talking to me. I loved looking through all the microscopes and seeing the weird preserved pig in a jar. The teacher made me excited to be in her biology class in the future. She even saved me extra cookies during the Magic of Matignon when my sister enrolled in the school. I am grateful for the opportunity to have been in her Honors and AP biology classes. 


Finally, during my first week at Matignon, I saw what all the fuss was about. Making friends was easy. I joined lots of clubs. My favorite part of Freshman Year was when I was elected Vice President of my class. Serving in this role for the past four years has been an honor. My favorite part of my experience at Matignon has been the lessons that happen in the classroom but stray from boring, everyday academics. I have found that the best classrooms, such as my junior/Ap English classes, are the ones that provide the safety to express my opinions, whether political or moral. Many schools do not provide this opportunity, and I hope Matignon continues to allow their students to experience the wonderful open discussions that I have cherished.